Home Mobility Samsung Galaxy S8 facial recognition bypassed with photo

Samsung Galaxy S8 facial recognition bypassed with photo

One of the much-heralded security features on the Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+, facial recognition, can be bypassed by using a photo or the face of a sleeping person, reports say.

An industry source in Seoul told the Korea Herald that the phones could be unlocked by the face of a sleeping person, or even just by a photo.

"For now, the facial recognition technology is only intended for fun. It should not be considered as a foolproof security measure," the source said.

Spanish phone expert MarcianoTech demonstrated the use of a photo to fool the facial recognition on the phone, at the New York launch on Thursday morning, Australian time.

The bypassing of facial recognition with a photo has been likened to a person claiming to have a secure system and storing passwords in clear text.

Tricking facial recognition software with photos is one of the first things that it is tested when devising such biometric security features.

The S8 and S8+ also have fingerprint and iris screening.

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Sam Varghese

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.