Home Enterprise Solutions NAB business banking back after 12-hour outage

NAB business banking back after 12-hour outage

National Australia Bank's business online banking service, NAB Connect, appears to be back on the air after having been offline most of the day on Wednesday.

The service functioned intermittently during the day for some customers, but the majority had no access.

The bank is yet to post any indication of the state of its services.

Both its Facebook and Twitter accounts only sport an apology from about eight hours ago at the time of writing (9.25pm AEST), saying:

"We’re aware that our business customers are having trouble logging into NAB Connect. We’re sorry about this and we’re working to fix it ASAP."

The last media release in the bank's online archive dates back to 10 October.

Three hours ago, the bank tweeted that payment cut-off times had been extended to 7:30pm and any NAB Connect payments lodged today had been processed.

Many customers expressed frustration on Twitter that they were unable to get payroll processed in time due to the outage.

The bank suffered outages to its online services in January. And in December, an outage left customers unable to use both phone and online banking services.

LEARN HOW TO BE A SUCCESSFUL MVNO

Did you know: 1 in 10 mobile services in Australia use an MVNO, as more consumers are turning away from the big 3 providers?

The Australian mobile landscape is changing, and you can take advantage of it.

Any business can grow its brand (and revenue) by adding mobile services to their product range.

From telcos to supermarkets, see who’s found success and learn how they did it in the free report ‘Rise of the MVNOs’.

This free report shows you how to become a successful MVNO:

· Track recent MVNO market trends
· See who’s found success with mobile
· Find out the secret to how they did it
· Learn how to launch your own MVNO service

DOWNLOAD NOW!

Sam Varghese

website statistics

A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.