Home Development Huawei gets mobile with car powered by AI smartphone

Huawei gets mobile with car powered by AI smartphone

Chinese global telecommunications giant Huawei is claiming it is the first mobile device manufacturer in the world to use an AI-powered smartphone to drive a car.

Huawei  says that unlike other driverless cars, which simply detect obstacles, it has transformed a Porsche Panamera into a driverless vehicle that doesn’t just see, but crucially, understands its surroundings.

“This means that can it can distinguish between 1000s of different objects including a cat and a dog, a ball or a bike and learn to take the most appropriate course of action,” Huawei says.

“Our smartphone is already outstanding at object recognition. We wanted to see if in a short space of time we could teach it to not only drive a car, but to use its AI capabilities to see certain objects, and be taught to avoid them” said Andrew Garrihy, chief marketing officer, Huawei Western Europe.

“If our technology is intelligent enough to achieve this in just five weeks – what else can it make possible?”

The technology is taking advantage of the AI capabilities already in the Huawei Mate 10 Pro, with the device using AI to automatically recognise objects like cats, dogs, food, and others, to help people take pictures like a pro.

Garrihy says the "RoadReader" project pushes the boundaries of Huawei’s object recognition technology and puts the learning capabilities, speed and performance of its AI-powered devices to the test.

According to Garrihy and Huawei, most autonomous cars currently being developed rely on the computing power of purpose-built chips developed by third party technology providers.

“However, as part of its ongoing mission to make the impossible possible, Huawei has used technology already available in its smartphones, demonstrating its superior functionality and ability to stand up to even the most advanced technology developed for use in self-driving cars,” the company says.

To see the Huawei ‘RoadReader’ in action click here.


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Peter Dinham

Peter Dinham is a co-founder of iTWire and a 35-year veteran journalist and corporate communications consultant. He has worked as a journalist in all forms of media – newspapers/magazines, radio, television, press agency and now, online – including with the Canberra Times, The Examiner (Tasmania), the ABC and AAP-Reuters. As a freelance journalist he also had articles published in Australian and overseas magazines. He worked in the corporate communications/public relations sector, in-house with an airline, and as a senior executive in Australia of the world’s largest communications consultancy, Burson-Marsteller. He also ran his own communications consultancy and was a co-founder in Australia of the global photographic agency, the Image Bank (now Getty Images).