Home Business Software AIM software market headed to US$27 billion: Gartner

AIM software market headed to US$27 billion: Gartner

AIM software market headed to US$27 billion: Gartner Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The worldwide application integration and middleware (AIM) software market continues to grow faster than the overall infrastructure software market, according to a new report that forecasts revenue is on track to surpass US$27 billion this year.

The report, from analyst firm Gartner, says the AIM software market is split into mature and emerging segments, with mature segments large in size, and most of the market consolidated in the hands of a few established players.

“A high proportion of revenue is generated from maintenance fees and growth is slow, typically single-digit,” Gartner says, citing examples of mature segments including application servers and business process management suites.

Fabrizio Biscotti, research vice-president at Gartner, says growth in mobile, big data, analytics, in-memory computing, cloud and Internet of Things initiatives is associated with digital business and requires application and integration professionals to invest in new AIM technologies.

"This, in turn, drives fresh integration approaches with new AIM technologies at their core, such as application programmable interface management and integration platform as a service."

Gartner says three main requirements are central to this shift.

Biscotti says that, firstly, digital organisations need an open, flexible and lightweight model that enables simpler and faster configuration, as well as deployment of both cloud and on-premises resources.

In addition, they need platforms that support diverse combinations of resources, applications, data, processes and things from within and outside the organisation. And finally, they need self-service middleware that can increase and decrease in scale rapidly.

"Cloud application infrastructure offerings are still maturing, yet already meet market demands for greater agility, scalability, productivity and efficiency better than their on-premises alternatives," Biscotti said.

"The older technology, however, often remains more suitable for the most demanding scenarios.”

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Peter Dinham

Peter Dinham is a co-founder of iTWire and a 35-year veteran journalist and corporate communications consultant. He has worked as a journalist in all forms of media – newspapers/magazines, radio, television, press agency and now, online – including with the Canberra Times, The Examiner (Tasmania), the ABC and AAP-Reuters. As a freelance journalist he also had articles published in Australian and overseas magazines. He worked in the corporate communications/public relations sector, in-house with an airline, and as a senior executive in Australia of the world’s largest communications consultancy, Burson-Marsteller. He also ran his own communications consultancy and was a co-founder in Australia of the global photographic agency, the Image Bank (now Getty Images).

 

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