Home Apps New Microsoft app skips Windows Phone support

New Microsoft app skips Windows Phone support

In an indication of exactly how small a share of the market Windows Phone has, Microsoft itself has not bothered to support the platform on its new Authenticator app.

Instead, the Redmond software behemoth has created versions that work on iOS and Android phones.

Once a password is entered into Authenticator, it removes the need for entering the same again when using a Microsoft account on another site.

One can enter one's username when signing in somewhere new and then a notification is sent to the phone of the user, with an Approve button. Once this is pressed, the user can gain entry.

But this does not work for Windows Phone because Microsoft deems the market share of its own mobile to be so low that the effort is not worth its while.

authenticator

Explaining why, Microsoft's Alex Simons wrote: "A few people have asked if this works with (the) Windows Phone version (of) Microsoft Authenticator.

"Windows Phone makes up less than 5% of the active users of our Authenticator Apps so we have prioritised getting this working with iOS and Android for now.

"If/When it becomes a big success on those high-scale platforms, we will evaluate adding support for Windows Phone."

LEARN HOW TO BE A SUCCESSFUL MVNO

Did you know: 1 in 10 mobile services in Australia use an MVNO, as more consumers are turning away from the big 3 providers?

The Australian mobile landscape is changing, and you can take advantage of it.

Any business can grow its brand (and revenue) by adding mobile services to their product range.

From telcos to supermarkets, see who’s found success and learn how they did it in the free report ‘Rise of the MVNOs’.

This free report shows you how to become a successful MVNO:

· Track recent MVNO market trends
· See who’s found success with mobile
· Find out the secret to how they did it
· Learn how to launch your own MVNO service

DOWNLOAD NOW!

Sam Varghese

website statistics

A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.